Community education

What is sulfide mining?  What companies are interested in the minerals throughout the region? Where are they exploring?  What policies and laws are in place to help protect us and the environment?  What are treaty rights?  What are indigenous rights?  What is environmental justice?  Learn about all of this and more!  Our mission is to educate our communities so they are empowered to hold corporations and governments accountable.

SULFIDE MINING                                                                                           

Acid mine drainage in a watershed can be a consequence of mining coal or mineral deposits. A significant amount of scientific research has been conducted to determine the chemical reactions that create acidity and lead to the precipitation of dissolved metals, but despite improvements in both prediction and prevention methods, acid mine drainage problems persist.(1)

Acid Mine Drainage Fact Sheet

Metallic Sulfide Mining: Impacts on Michigan’s Wildlife

Hardrock Mining: Risks to Community Health (New!)

URANIUM MINING                                                                                         

Nuclear Power’s Other Tragedy: Communities Living with Uranium Mining (New!)

Uranium Mining Fact Sheet (New!)

Uranium Mining Slide Show (New!)

BACKGROUND ON MINING ACTIVITY IN THE REGION

FACT SHEET: CLEAN WATER ACT CITIZEN SUIT AGAINST FLAMBEAU MINING COMPANY (New!)

Bitterroot Resources Ltd, Geology and Exploration of the Upper Peninsula Projects, Michigan, USA (New!)

judge-patterson-08-18-09-eagle-project-contested-case-decision

Base metal mine development activity in the ceded territories (p. 7)

Rio-Tinto-background-information-2011-1 (See pages 5-8 for info on the Kennecott Eagle Mine in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and the Flambeau Mine in Ladysmith, Wisconsin) 

Environmental Law Editorial on the Eagle Mine by Scott Schultz

TREATY RIGHTS & CULTURAL RESOURCES                                       

Treaty with the Chippewa of October 4, 1842

Indian Treaties and the Survival of the Great Lakes

Traditional Ojibway Resources in the Western Great Lakes

NATIVE AMERICAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM & SACRED SITES     

American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978

Federal Executive Order 13007 (on Indian Sacred Sites) of May 24, 1996

National Historic Preservation Act

National Congress of American Indians Resolution for the Protection of Eagle Rock

Fact Sheet: Protection of Native American Sacred Places

Sacred Places at Risk, Featured Article by Suzan Shown Harjo

The Need for Stronger Legal Protection of Native American Sacred Places

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE                                                                       

Principles of Environmental Justice

US Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Justice Initiative (NYTimes article)

Environmental Justice Plan for the State of Michigan

Federal Executive Order 12898 (on Environmental Justice) of February 11, 1994

Environmental Justice and Tribes

INDIGENOUS RIGHTS                                                                                   

Amnesty International Submission to UN On UK Transnational Corporations (New!)

Fact Sheet on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (New!)

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Indigenous Rights & Eagle Rock

Agenda 21 Chapter 26: International Recognition of the Role of Indigenous Peoples in Sustainable Development

BOOKS                                                                                                                 

In The Way of Development


2 Responses to Community education

  1. Mike D says:

    The resolution for the Protection of Eagle Rock was initiated by the Michigan Indian Elders Association in September, 2010 at the NICOA Conference at Grand Traverse Resort in Traverse City, MI.

    • Miigwech, thank you, to the Michigan Indian Elders Association for taking such an important initiative for the protection of sacred Eagle Rock from the consequences of mining by Rio Tinto-Kennecott!

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